Kept out: How banks block people of color from homeownership

Fifty years after the federal Fair Housing Act banned racial discrimination in lending, African Americans and Latinos continue to be routinely denied conventional mortgage loans at rates far higher than their white counterparts. This modern-day redlining persisted in 61 metro areas even when controlling for applicants’ income, loan amount and neighborhood, according to millions of … records analyzed by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting. Lenders and their trade organizations do not dispute the fact that they turn away people of color at rates far greater than whites, [and] singled out the three-digit credit score … as especially important in lending decisions. Reveal’s analysis included all records publicly available under the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act. Credit score was not included because that information is not publicly available. That’s because lenders have deflected attempts to force them to report that data to the government. America’s largest bank, JPMorgan Chase & Co., has argued that the data should remain closed off even to academics. At the same time, studies have found proprietary credit score algorithms to have a discriminatory impact on borrowers of color. The “decades-old credit scoring model” currently used “does not take into account consumer data on … bill payments,” Republican Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina wrote in August. “This exclusion disproportionately hurts African-Americans, Latinos, and young people who are otherwise creditworthy.”

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Where Do You Go When You Die? The Increasing Signs that Human Consciousness Remains After Death

Clinically, we understand death to mean the state that takes hold after our hearts stop beating. Blood circulation comes to a halt, we don't breathe, our brains shut down—and that's what divides the states we occupy from one moment (alive) to the next (dead). Philosophically, though, our definition of death hinges on something else: the point past which we’re no longer able…